NEBUCHADREZZAR I
(NABU-KUDURRU-USUR in babylonian; reigned 1126–1105 B.C.)
   Babylonian king of the Second Dynasty of Isin. He secured his place in the Babylonian historical tradition by a decisive victory over Elam, which had been a major threat to Babylonia for some generations. He not only defeated the Elamite king Hutteludush-Inshushinak but also recovered the statues of the god Marduk and of Marduk’s wife Sarpanitum, which had been taken to Susa. The triumphal return of these statues may have given rise to the composition of the creation myth enuma elish. Nebuchadrezzar utilized booty from the Elamite campaign to rebuild sanctuaries in several Babylonian cities.

Historical Dictionary of Mesopotamia. . 2012.

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